From Bleached Bones

John Lee's Illustration Blog
In my Illustration 1 class, we covered a cool compositional tool called Informal Subdivision, which was a tool devised by Andrew Loomis, and of which I learned from Kali Ciesemier’s awesome blog. 
In essence, you create a random grid of horizontal, vertical, and diagonal lines, and force yourself to make a composition within those constraints.
It makes you adhere to larger shapes and utilize certain hot spots within the page as your main areas of focus. It also makes a lot of your compositional decision making for you, which results in some solutions you wouldn’t have thought of (that was my primary motivating factor for showing it to my class; an oft-repeated student mistake is to thumbnail for the sake of thumbnailing, and not actually explore potential compositions fully.)I drew alongside with them real quickly, and came up with some weird, wonky stuff.
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In my Illustration 1 class, we covered a cool compositional tool called Informal Subdivision, which was a tool devised by Andrew Loomis, and of which I learned from Kali Ciesemier’s awesome blog. 
In essence, you create a random grid of horizontal, vertical, and diagonal lines, and force yourself to make a composition within those constraints.
It makes you adhere to larger shapes and utilize certain hot spots within the page as your main areas of focus. It also makes a lot of your compositional decision making for you, which results in some solutions you wouldn’t have thought of (that was my primary motivating factor for showing it to my class; an oft-repeated student mistake is to thumbnail for the sake of thumbnailing, and not actually explore potential compositions fully.)I drew alongside with them real quickly, and came up with some weird, wonky stuff.
Zoom
Info

In my Illustration 1 class, we covered a cool compositional tool called Informal Subdivision, which was a tool devised by Andrew Loomis, and of which I learned from Kali Ciesemier’s awesome blog. 

In essence, you create a random grid of horizontal, vertical, and diagonal lines, and force yourself to make a composition within those constraints.

It makes you adhere to larger shapes and utilize certain hot spots within the page as your main areas of focus. It also makes a lot of your compositional decision making for you, which results in some solutions you wouldn’t have thought of (that was my primary motivating factor for showing it to my class; an oft-repeated student mistake is to thumbnail for the sake of thumbnailing, and not actually explore potential compositions fully.)

I drew alongside with them real quickly, and came up with some weird, wonky stuff.

Notes

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  7. bareyrteeth said: Awesome! That book is super excellent!
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