From Bleached Bones

John Lee's Illustration Blog
A couple of weeks ago, I was approached by Daniel Nyari and Marc Scheff to do two drawings for an illustrator-initiated project intended to highlight some of the people, concepts, and institutions responsible for the 2008 Financial Crisis. It’s a simple format; a deck of cards, each with a unique illustration and idea. The level of talent that Daniel and Marc accumulated for this project is staggering, and I’m humbled to be a part of it. Check out the main site for the project here: 52shadesofgreed.com
I’ve written a little bit about my personal experiences with the last five years in this post from awhile ago, but I don’t think I did a good job at conveying how it really felt. So, you know how when a large moment comes around, either one that cleaves huge paths in history, or one as simple as when you realize you love someone, you kind of just feel it? In your gut, or on your skin, or even an itch on the back of your head. David Rakoff described it better than I could: 

“Have you ever had one of those moments when know that you’re being visited by your own future? They come so rarely and with little fanfare, those moments. They’re not particularly photogenic. There’s no breach in the clouds to reveal the shining city on a hill. No folk dancing children outside your bus, no production values to speak of— just a glimpse of such quotidian, incontrovertible truth that after the initial shock at the supreme weirdness of it all, a kind of calm sets in. So this is to be my life.”

I remember sitting at my work desk, a space heater in tow, watching the market numbers fall in real-time. I was supposed to be working on small editorial piece, perhaps about a concert, or maybe a local celebrity— but all I could do was watch these numbers decrease in value, negatives get highlighted in blood red, and bar graphs dip like one of those undersea topographical maps. I’m just an illustrator— I didn’t really have a sense of the totality of what it all meant. I thought briefly about what it might mean to me in terms work opportunities, but honestly, I was thinking mostly about shortages. Would I have enough to eat? Pay rent? Could I afford enough gas to just get the hell out of there if I wanted to? I thought about my family, and what it would mean to the supposed stability that they had worked their entire lives to build.
And all of that contributed to this sense of, well, weightlessness. Of free falling. As if you were walking along, and somebody somewhere just flipped a switch that turned gravity off.
Nowadays, I can see, with the unusual clarity of hindsight, that this helpless feeling was the result of the poor decision making, avarice, and unbridled selfishness of a distant few, a culture of greed. While we were floating, doors were being closed to us: investments and savings were being slashed, homes were foreclosed on, and jobs were terminated. “So this is to be my life.” 
And for what? Why? 
If you’re not angry about it; well, quite frankly you should be. Regardless of age, belief, or political affiliation, we all got screwed, every single one of us. And it’s not getting better. We continue to kick the can down the road.
Get educated and get involved. Help by spreading the word on this project! Reblog/tweet/yell from your windows please!
Zoom
Info
A couple of weeks ago, I was approached by Daniel Nyari and Marc Scheff to do two drawings for an illustrator-initiated project intended to highlight some of the people, concepts, and institutions responsible for the 2008 Financial Crisis. It’s a simple format; a deck of cards, each with a unique illustration and idea. The level of talent that Daniel and Marc accumulated for this project is staggering, and I’m humbled to be a part of it. Check out the main site for the project here: 52shadesofgreed.com
I’ve written a little bit about my personal experiences with the last five years in this post from awhile ago, but I don’t think I did a good job at conveying how it really felt. So, you know how when a large moment comes around, either one that cleaves huge paths in history, or one as simple as when you realize you love someone, you kind of just feel it? In your gut, or on your skin, or even an itch on the back of your head. David Rakoff described it better than I could: 

“Have you ever had one of those moments when know that you’re being visited by your own future? They come so rarely and with little fanfare, those moments. They’re not particularly photogenic. There’s no breach in the clouds to reveal the shining city on a hill. No folk dancing children outside your bus, no production values to speak of— just a glimpse of such quotidian, incontrovertible truth that after the initial shock at the supreme weirdness of it all, a kind of calm sets in. So this is to be my life.”

I remember sitting at my work desk, a space heater in tow, watching the market numbers fall in real-time. I was supposed to be working on small editorial piece, perhaps about a concert, or maybe a local celebrity— but all I could do was watch these numbers decrease in value, negatives get highlighted in blood red, and bar graphs dip like one of those undersea topographical maps. I’m just an illustrator— I didn’t really have a sense of the totality of what it all meant. I thought briefly about what it might mean to me in terms work opportunities, but honestly, I was thinking mostly about shortages. Would I have enough to eat? Pay rent? Could I afford enough gas to just get the hell out of there if I wanted to? I thought about my family, and what it would mean to the supposed stability that they had worked their entire lives to build.
And all of that contributed to this sense of, well, weightlessness. Of free falling. As if you were walking along, and somebody somewhere just flipped a switch that turned gravity off.
Nowadays, I can see, with the unusual clarity of hindsight, that this helpless feeling was the result of the poor decision making, avarice, and unbridled selfishness of a distant few, a culture of greed. While we were floating, doors were being closed to us: investments and savings were being slashed, homes were foreclosed on, and jobs were terminated. “So this is to be my life.” 
And for what? Why? 
If you’re not angry about it; well, quite frankly you should be. Regardless of age, belief, or political affiliation, we all got screwed, every single one of us. And it’s not getting better. We continue to kick the can down the road.
Get educated and get involved. Help by spreading the word on this project! Reblog/tweet/yell from your windows please!
Zoom
Info

A couple of weeks ago, I was approached by Daniel Nyari and Marc Scheff to do two drawings for an illustrator-initiated project intended to highlight some of the people, concepts, and institutions responsible for the 2008 Financial Crisis. It’s a simple format; a deck of cards, each with a unique illustration and idea. The level of talent that Daniel and Marc accumulated for this project is staggering, and I’m humbled to be a part of it. Check out the main site for the project here: 52shadesofgreed.com

I’ve written a little bit about my personal experiences with the last five years in this post from awhile ago, but I don’t think I did a good job at conveying how it really felt. So, you know how when a large moment comes around, either one that cleaves huge paths in history, or one as simple as when you realize you love someone, you kind of just feel it? In your gut, or on your skin, or even an itch on the back of your head. David Rakoff described it better than I could: 

Have you ever had one of those moments when know that you’re being visited by your own future? They come so rarely and with little fanfare, those moments. They’re not particularly photogenic. There’s no breach in the clouds to reveal the shining city on a hill. No folk dancing children outside your bus, no production values to speak of— just a glimpse of such quotidian, incontrovertible truth that after the initial shock at the supreme weirdness of it all, a kind of calm sets in. So this is to be my life.

I remember sitting at my work desk, a space heater in tow, watching the market numbers fall in real-time. I was supposed to be working on small editorial piece, perhaps about a concert, or maybe a local celebrity— but all I could do was watch these numbers decrease in value, negatives get highlighted in blood red, and bar graphs dip like one of those undersea topographical maps. I’m just an illustrator— I didn’t really have a sense of the totality of what it all meant. I thought briefly about what it might mean to me in terms work opportunities, but honestly, I was thinking mostly about shortages. Would I have enough to eat? Pay rent? Could I afford enough gas to just get the hell out of there if I wanted to? I thought about my family, and what it would mean to the supposed stability that they had worked their entire lives to build.

And all of that contributed to this sense of, well, weightlessness. Of free falling. As if you were walking along, and somebody somewhere just flipped a switch that turned gravity off.

Nowadays, I can see, with the unusual clarity of hindsight, that this helpless feeling was the result of the poor decision making, avarice, and unbridled selfishness of a distant few, a culture of greed. While we were floating, doors were being closed to us: investments and savings were being slashed, homes were foreclosed on, and jobs were terminated. “So this is to be my life.” 

And for what? Why? 

If you’re not angry about it; well, quite frankly you should be. Regardless of age, belief, or political affiliation, we all got screwed, every single one of us. And it’s not getting better. We continue to kick the can down the road.

Get educated and get involved. Help by spreading the word on this project! Reblog/tweet/yell from your windows please!

Notes

  1. multiverseadventurer reblogged this from zeedikay
  2. choco-swirl-bunny reblogged this from derrickdent
  3. conmanmurphy reblogged this from derrickdent
  4. nickvinsky reblogged this from johnleedraws
  5. zeedikay reblogged this from jocosejoni
  6. reptiliansands reblogged this from johnleedraws
  7. myosiss reblogged this from derrickdent
  8. zebibbles reblogged this from johnleedraws
  9. chewingxglass reblogged this from derrickdent
  10. neukunstgruppe reblogged this from jeremyluther
  11. derrickdent reblogged this from johnleedraws and added:
    I had a conversation with a friend a few days ago about how easy it is to take for granted that one has amazingly...
  12. loubird7 reblogged this from johnleedraws